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Where should I start?
Mac_D00D307 Offline
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Post: #1
Where should I start?
Hey eveyone! I just signed up, though the only code I know is HTML, I really want to get into making apps on my mac. So, I was wondering, where should I get started? Everyone must have started some place, so where did you started? Any books / websites that are for beginner coders on the Mac OS are appreciated. Thanks in advance!
2006.01.20 11:34 AM
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DarylF2 Offline
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Post: #2
Where should I start?
I recommend using Xcode to program in Objective-C using Cocoa. If you have experience programming in C, Objective-C is easy to pick up, and Cocoa is AMAZINGLY powerful and easy to understand (especially if you have object-oriented programming experience). Aaron Hillegass's book "Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X" is terrific, and I also like O'Reilly's "Learning Cocoa with Objective-C" (second edition).

If you don't know C, it would be best to start slower. See if a local community college offers any introductory C programming courses, or perhaps search the web for online equivalents. I'm sure there are some great introductory C programming books, but I don't know any to recommend except perhaps for Stephen G. Kochan's "Programming in C", which I used in college (my copy is the "revised edition" from 1988, but there is probably a newer version available).
2006.01.20 01:44 PM
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Carlos Camacho Offline
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Post: #3
Where should I start?
The two books that Daryl recommended are very good. Go to developer.apple.com and download Xcode (unless you already have it.) Install it. There are some free documents/tutorials at Apple's site as well. cocoadevcentral.com contains some tutorials to look at. With Aaron's book in hand, and Xcode installed, you should be ready to learn programming on Mac OS X.

As an alternative, you might want to take a look at REALbasic (http://realbasic.com/) or BlitzBasic (http://www.blitzbasic.com) along with their Mac OS X GUI builder (I forget the name.)

If you're coming from the world of HTML/web development, you might also be interested in learning PHP (install PHP on your Mac or use MAMP, search this forum for MAMP). Java, Python and Ruby would be also good to start off with too.

Cheers,

Carlos A. Camacho, Super Mod
2006.01.22 08:34 PM
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Mac_D00D307 Offline
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Post: #4
Where should I start?
Carlos Camacho Wrote:The two books that Daryl recommended are very good. Go to developer.apple.com and download Xcode (unless you already have it.) Install it. There are some free documents/tutorials at Apple's site as well. cocoadevcentral.com contains some tutorials to look at. With Aaron's book in hand, and Xcode installed, you should be ready to learn programming on Mac OS X.
According that last sentence, I don't need to know C first, or should I learn C before going into Cocoa.

As an alternative, you might want to take a look at REALbasic (http://realbasic.com/) or BlitzBasic (http://www.blitzbasic.com) along with their Mac OS X GUI builder (I forget the name.)
I have tried REALbasic before, but Cocoa sounds like where I want to go.

If you're coming from the world of HTML/web development, you might also be interested in learning PHP (install PHP on your Mac or use MAMP, search this forum for MAMP). Java, Python and Ruby would be also good to start off with too.

I thought PHP was for web pages? Because there are programs out there *cough*iWeb*cough* for making web pages, plus I really want to get into making Apps.

Cheers,
My comments are in red. Smile
2006.01.22 09:11 PM
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DarylF2 Offline
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Post: #5
Where should I start?
The Cocoa API is for Objective-C primarily, although I *think* it can also be used from Java and perhaps AppleScript. Objective-C is Cocoa's native language, though, so you should really use it if possible. Objective-C itself is an object-oriented extension of C; any valid C code will work in an Objective-C program. Objective-C is also, to a limited extent, compatible with C++ (more precisely, Objective-C and C++ can be mixed to a limited extent within a single file, which must have a ".mm" or ".M" extension instead of the usual ".m" extension used for Objective-C source implementation files).

So, you need to either already know, or be willing to learn, C programming before tackling Objective-C.
2006.01.23 12:14 AM
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Derek Kuhl Offline
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Post: #6
Where should I start?
According that last sentence, I don't need to know C first, or should I learn C before going into Cocoa.
Learning C is important as you will have to understand pointers and the memory allocation system. HTML, Javascript, or Java do not normally have the developer paying attention to memory management. Understanding the memory management scheme of C will help you as you move up to Objective-C and Cocoa. C is not really that hard, since you will probably be able to pick it up and have a very good understanding within 2 weeks.

I have tried REALbasic before, but Cocoa sounds like where I want to go.
Could be. Cocoa is just about as easy to use once you learn it. The Basic alternative is easier to learn at the beginning.

I thought PHP was for web pages? Because there are programs out there *cough*iWeb*cough* for making web pages, plus I really want to get into making Apps.
There are many different aspects of Apple's frameworks and part of which was and sort of is web development. You can use one of the language bridges to use Python or Ruby. The one tricky thing with Objective-C as opposed to those languages are the usage of pointers. For many Java and other garbage collection languages, the Cocoa and Objective-C interface may have a difficult memory management concept to grasp.
2006.01.23 09:33 PM
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hammonjj Offline
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Post: #7
Where should I start?
Quote:I thought PHP was for web pages? Because there are programs out there *cough*iWeb*cough* for making web pages, plus I really want to get into making Apps.

iWeb is so limiting, but ok for basic webpages. You should consider learning php, css, and mySQL if you want real power.
2007.03.02 12:26 AM
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macrunch Offline
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Post: #8
Where should I start?
It is good to know where to start. I am even worst. I do not know any programming languages well. I know the syntax. But implementations is the hard part. I don't have any hands on experience. But after using MAC, you gotta learn to produce the application on your own.
2007.04.23 05:49 AM
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iFeed Offline
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Post: #9
Where should I start?
I'd suggest writing simple console programs that read in files and do prints out test.

I think i started with this site
http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial.html

After i figure out how to properly use pointers c++ became much easier. I think i figured out by having several structs and changing my pointer between them and creating arrays.
2007.04.26 11:11 AM
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Ingemar Offline
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Post: #10
Where should I start?
DarylF2 Wrote:If you have experience programming in C, Objective-C is easy to pick up, and Cocoa is AMAZINGLY powerful and easy to understand (especially if you have object-oriented programming experience).
People keep saying this, but are there any solid arguments? Like, look at these two sample programs doing something more that loading a nib and running default handlers? Things that are strikingly intuitive in comparison?
2007.04.29 11:57 AM
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